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The Report Florida Lionfish app is now more interactive than ever. Not only can you continue reporting your lionfish sightings and catches, your reports and photographs are documented on an interactive map. The map includes your important data such as where you found your catch, the date caught, how many you saw or removed and what type of gear you used. You can use this map to help determine where lionfish are being spotted and what reefs have recently been cleaned. There is even a “show reef” option that maps all of Florida’s artificial reefs and provides the location and depth at which each reef can be found.

You can also share your submission on Face book or Twitter. Use #FWCLionfish to make sure we see it as well.
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New Hampshire Marine Rule Changes for 2015

Posted December 16, 2014 By NewsEngine

CONCORD, N.H. — As the start of the new year approaches, the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department wants anglers and marine harvesters to be aware of several changes to rules and state laws that will take effect in 2015. These include the following changes to the rules for smelt, striped bass, white perch, haddock, and cod:

– The daily limit for smelt taken from coastal and estuarine waters is reduced from 10 to 4 quarts liquid measure of whole smelt. This applies to both recreational and commercial harvesters and was implemented in response to substantial decline in coastal smelt population observed in the winter and spring of 2014.
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First Right Whales of Season Sighted

Posted December 16, 2014 By NewsEngine

BRUNSWICK, Ga. – The season’s first sighting of North Atlantic right whales on the Georgia coast underscores the fact that Georgia and north Florida are the only known calving grounds for these endangered whales.

A Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission survey plane spotted a right whale mother and her new calf 16 miles off Cumberland Island Saturday. The mom, cataloged as right whale number 2145, is 24 years old and has been documented with five calves, the previous one in 2009.

Each winter, pregnant right whales and small numbers of non-breeding whales swim more than 1,000 miles from their feeding grounds off Canada and New England to the warmer waters of Georgia and northeastern Florida. Here, from late November through March, they give birth and nurse their young.
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