Language Options: English English Français Français Español Español
NOTICE TO VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS:
In an effort to improve your visit, we've removed all ads from Outdoor News Daily but will continue to offer our popular Outdoor Gear Search for those looking for quality outdoor gear.
Subscribe Via EmailOur daily news delivered directly to your inbox!

Prescribed Burn on Seavey Island to Improve Wildlife Habitat

CONCORD, N.H. — New Hampshire Fish and Game and the N.H. Department of Resources and Economic Development Division of Forests and Lands, with support from US Fish and Wildlife Service, will be conducting a “prescribed burn” in areas on Seavey Island, Isles of Shoals. The prescribed burn is likely to occur between September 12 and October 15; the date will be finalized when the weather and atmospheric conditions are seen to be safe.

Prescribed burning, which is highly controlled and conducted by trained professionals, is an indispensable tool for safely managing the Coastal Island Habitat community. Non-native and invasive species of plants and grasses are dominating the vegetation structure and creating habitat that is too dense for the restored colony of nesting terns. Fire is a tool used in restoring or converting habitat conditions that are capable of supporting rare and important wildlife, including the federally endangered Roseate Tern. The prescribed burn will take place within controlled areas on Seavey Island, Isles of Shoals. This is allowed under a state-issued burn permit, which also serves as a smoke management permit (RSA 227-L17).

Precautions will be taken to limit smoke and to ensure that the prescribed burn stays within the boundaries of the controlled burning areas. In addition, at least two boats will be available just off island at all times as part of the protocol to deal with any unexpected situations. Local and regional law enforcement officials and emergency management officials have been notified of the timing and location of controlled burning. However, neighbors should recognize that atmospheric conditions could change, and smoke may create temporary visibility hazards. The smoke poses no imminent threat to people’s health or the community.